Random Musings

My affair with life and the random thought that follows

Reblogged from jaimelannister

(Source: patheticjunkies)

"It’s so beautiful to kiss
someone
who actually
means a lot to you."

Reblogged from lovequotesrus

Alena M.  

Everything you love is here

(via lovequotesrus)

(Source: 400eurojob)

Reblogged from nevver

nevver:

How to tell a story

Reblogged from theartofanimation

theartofanimation:

Laura Bifano

Reblogged from romy7

The reader lives a thousand lives before he dies. The man who never reads lives only one.

(Source: rhaegl)

Reblogged from fridayfelts

crying-to-the-ocean:

chlorodream:

lady-of-redemption:

He did it. He actually managed to describe how it feels to live with depression and suicidal tendencies.

this is really, really important

If this is button poetry video I will LOVE whomever leaves me the link

In case anyone want to hear him speak, here is the link

(Source: cantcontrolthegay)

"It would be possible to describe everything scientifically, but it would make no sense; it would be without meaning, as if you described a Beethoven symphony as a variation of wave pressure."

Reblogged from observando

Albert Einstein (via observando)

Reblogged from romy7

micdotcom:

Intense photos from Ferguson last night look more like Iraq than the U.S.

Civil unrest in response to the shooting death of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., has received the lion’s share of media coverage. But as protests continus, the authorities’ response has increasingly looked less like police action and more like a crackdown in a war zone.

But it’s not just the equipment

Reblogged from teded

teded:

How the Federal Reserve regulates inflation

1. If the total amount of currency circulating increases faster than the total value of goods and services in the economy, each individual piece will be able to buy a smaller portion of those things than before. This is called inflation.

2. On the other hand, if the money supply remained the same while more goods and services were produced, each dollar’s value would increase, in a process known as deflation.

3. So which is worse? Too much inflation means that the money in your wallet will be worth less tomorrow, making you want to spend it today. While this stimulates business, it also encourages overconsumption or hoarding commodities like food and fuel, raising their prices and leading to consumer shortages as well as more inflation.

4. But deflation makes people want to hold on to their money. The decrease in consumer spending reduces business profits, which leads to more unemployment and a further decrease in spending, causing the economy to keep shrinking.

So most economists believe that while too much of either is dangerous, a small consistent amount of inflation is necessary to encourage economic growth. The Fed uses vast amounts of economic data to get the numbers just right in order to stimulate growth and keep people employed without letting inflation reach disruptive levels. 

Animation by Qa’ed Mai

Reblogged from allcreatures

montereybayaquarium:

Raising awareness, one image at a time

We know that beautiful images can move people in profound ways to act on behalf of animals.

National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore is on a mission to inspire people to protect wild animals by taking studio portraits of their kin at zoos and aquariums for his Photo Ark project.

The stark black and white backgrounds equalize the animals’ importance, whether the largest elephant or the smallest insect.

"By isolating animals on black and white backgrounds, we can look them directly in the eye and quickly see that these creatures contain beauty, grace and intelligence. Perhaps some even hold the key to our very salvation," Joel says.

At the Aquarium

We had the honor of hosting Joel recently for two fun and frenetic days as he photographed birds, fish, cephalopods and invertebrates. Joel’s hardworking staff is busy processing thousands of images he shot here and elsewhere, but we’ll soon share more of ours — plus what it’s like to work with Joel, a dozen aquarists, two other photographers and 30 critters parading in and out of one room.

In the meantime please support Joel by liking his Facebook page. To date Joel has documented nearly 4,000 animals for the Photo Ark and won’t stop until he gets them all — and you can help!